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Opinion Home

DC should be a state

DC should be a state

To the Editor:I have learned during this pandemic that I disagree with my representative. Yes, altho…
Stop the madness of democracy

Stop the madness of democracy

To the Editor:For all who believe in democracy where the majority rules, please keep in mind that in…
Thanks for saving stray dog

Thanks for saving stray dog

To the Editor:A big thank you to the two people who pulled their vehicles over on Caton Farm Road at…
A living wage To the Editor: In the aftermath of the rampant murders in Chicago, the demonstrations demanding justice for African Americans and the curse of the coronavirus, Americans are experiencing dizzying anxiety and psychological disorientation. Nothing can be taken for granted. But the root of the racism, the disproportionate spread of COVID-19 among the have-nots, the gun-bred violence of the mean streets is the screaming poverty that since Reagan’s time has become the unashamed legacy of the Republican Party. Its roots go back to the 1870s, when lawyers for the railroads became justices of the Supreme Court and misapplied the amendments meant to give full citizenship to former slaves, but sadly also recognized corporations as persons – the worst mistake the Supreme Court ever made. Too few people, even educated ones, make the distinction between capitalism and corporatism. Corporatism is a dangerous growth, a parasite on a healthy body. Corporations are impersonal, bottom line oriented, nonhuman. Their drive for monopoly destroys the beneficial aspects of capitalism, i.e., consideration for the common good. Capitalists are people with souls and consciences, real human beings, more apt to realize their dependence on labor and willing to do their duty to God, their fellow citizens, and share in the form of taxation. So, blame corporatism, not real capitalism, and the absolute lack of the willingness of some employers, who could, to pay a living wage. The problem is systemically imposed poverty with racism as a contributing cause. The lack of equality in the fair-shared distribution of wealth. The lack of fraternity and indifference to the common good. The all-too-narrow concept of liberty, confined to making money for the individual entrepreneur and corporate entity without acknowledging their duty, their moral and societal obligation to their fellow citizens and government, their ingratitude to the system that enabled them to amass such great wealth. Marion J. Reis Lombard  Time for civil discussion To the Editor: I am writing this to the wonderfully misguided writers out there who send attacking letters to their opposing political parties. I’m not siding with either party. I’m siding with American citizens, not politicians who have no desire to help anyone but themselves, despite what they say. Attacking other people’s beliefs will not change their minds; in fact, they’re likely to become more entrenched. So, by attacking, you actually make your position worse. We need to civilly explain our opinions and civilly listen to others and civilly come to compromise. Our national leaders have chosen to attack each other constantly, and we see the horrible results in the news every day. It’s time for American citizens to act civilly toward each other and compromise, unlike our national leaders. Extend the olive branches, letters to the editor writers. Be adults, not children like our leaders. Don Morgan Channahon Social distancing  at Joliet golf courses?

A living wage To the Editor: In the aftermath of the rampant murders in Chicago, the demonstrations demanding justice for African Americans and the curse of the coronavirus, Americans are experiencing dizzying anxiety and psychological disorientation. Nothing can be taken for granted. But the root of the racism, the disproportionate spread of COVID-19 among the have-nots, the gun-bred violence of the mean streets is the screaming poverty that since Reagan’s time has become the unashamed legacy of the Republican Party. Its roots go back to the 1870s, when lawyers for the railroads became justices of the Supreme Court and misapplied the amendments meant to give full citizenship to former slaves, but sadly also recognized corporations as persons – the worst mistake the Supreme Court ever made. Too few people, even educated ones, make the distinction between capitalism and corporatism. Corporatism is a dangerous growth, a parasite on a healthy body. Corporations are impersonal, bottom line oriented, nonhuman. Their drive for monopoly destroys the beneficial aspects of capitalism, i.e., consideration for the common good. Capitalists are people with souls and consciences, real human beings, more apt to realize their dependence on labor and willing to do their duty to God, their fellow citizens, and share in the form of taxation. So, blame corporatism, not real capitalism, and the absolute lack of the willingness of some employers, who could, to pay a living wage. The problem is systemically imposed poverty with racism as a contributing cause. The lack of equality in the fair-shared distribution of wealth. The lack of fraternity and indifference to the common good. The all-too-narrow concept of liberty, confined to making money for the individual entrepreneur and corporate entity without acknowledging their duty, their moral and societal obligation to their fellow citizens and government, their ingratitude to the system that enabled them to amass such great wealth. Marion J. Reis Lombard Time for civil discussion To the Editor: I am writing this to the wonderfully misguided writers out there who send attacking letters to their opposing political parties. I’m not siding with either party. I’m siding with American citizens, not politicians who have no desire to help anyone but themselves, despite what they say. Attacking other people’s beliefs will not change their minds; in fact, they’re likely to become more entrenched. So, by attacking, you actually make your position worse. We need to civilly explain our opinions and civilly listen to others and civilly come to compromise. Our national leaders have chosen to attack each other constantly, and we see the horrible results in the news every day. It’s time for American citizens to act civilly toward each other and compromise, unlike our national leaders. Extend the olive branches, letters to the editor writers. Be adults, not children like our leaders. Don Morgan Channahon Social distancing at Joliet golf courses?

To the Editor:COVID-19 still is highly contagious. Up until July 1, anyone playing golf had the priv…
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